Caught

This piece originally began with what I thought would be a series (and it may still be). I was working on two different pieces dealing with our relationship as humans with the “natural world.” I was unhappy with where I had gotten with both of them and on a whim I decided to try them together. Violà!

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This piece, called “Caught,” looks at the vicious circle that develops with our treatment of the “natural world.” Our ignorance of our interconnectedness with it (and our actions originating from that lack of knowledge) creates a scenario that teaches us how interconnected we really are (think climate change’s effects) in a way that feels less like being part of a whole or in a relationship and more like being at the mercy of an angry, powerful Other–one we helped to create. As nature gets sicker, we get sicker. As we pollute nature, we pollute ourselves.

These were the two pieces that went into “Caught”:

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The first was created originally from a photo I took at a rest stop on Mother’s Day and another that I’d taken a couple months back. The idea was to intertwine the human with the tree, including its roots.

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The second was taken from a photo I took last weekend at Jones Bridge Park in Norcross, GA. A cement block was lodged in the Chattahoochee river along with other debris. It was combined with another photo I took a few months ago. Here, it’s the idea of being “caught” (cement block around the head, and his appearing to rest in it and smile) in our own trash and being completely oblivious.

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We’ll see if it develops into a series….

Light Present and Past

Last week my uncle was baling hay and I couldn’t resist taking my phone and getting a few shots of the farm and bales one evening.

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I grew up going to his and my grandparents’ farm, staying weekends and weeks at a time over the years. Those were hot halcyon days filled with hazy, diffused sunlight and (barely) cool breezes blowing through the windows in the evening.

I was playing around with the Retrolux filter in the Snapseed app and came up with something that gets a little closer to what the farm means to me. The landscape shot through with memory, filled with light both present and past.

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At a Rest Stop on Mother’s Day

I don’t know why I’d never stopped at this rest area before. It’s the first one, right inside the South Carolina line coming from Georgia. It’s not like I haven’t driven that stretch of road dozens of times over the years. But today, I stopped. I’m glad I did. The rest stop sits on Lake Hartwell, and behind the mandatory rest stop facilities are a thick swath of trees on land gently sloping towards the water. I got out my phone, of course. I took lots of photos, but these, of a little girl, were the ones I liked best. Her mom was there taking photos of her (you can see her in the second photo)–a nice Mother’s Day outing. They both were having a blast.

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Eternal Childhood: Looking Forward, Looking Back

Another iPhone creation for the Eternal Childhood series. Looking into the past for its own promises, fulfilled–or maybe not quite fulfilled–can be an endless process, an endless regress that may not reveal any new wisdom–and we might miss the promise right in front of us, smaller at the moment, but glowing brightly, ready to lead on.

Looking forward, looking back

Eternal Childhood: The things we carry

“The things we carry” is another piece in the Eternal Childhood series, which explores the magic not just of childhood, but of being human itself. A magic we could experience if we could but glimpse ourselves and the world differently for even one moment.
Melissa D. Johnston-The things we carry

Eternal Childhood: Phases

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A recent iPhone creation, using one of the photos I took last Sunday at Jones Bridge Park in Norcross, Georgia. It’s a part of a new series, Eternal Childhood, which explores the magic of childhood–a magic than can exist in every moment, even for adults.

“Resolve to be always beginning—to be a beginner!” –Rainer Maria Rilke

What Flow Sometimes Feels Like

Expansion

Expansion

When you’re in flow, the spirit expands and the world becomes magically filled with possibilities.

Playing or singing music is perhaps one of the most universal ways to enter flow. I don’t sing anymore, but whenever I’m taking photos, I almost always feel in flow. Ditto for the postproduction process. Perhaps that’s why I’m so addicted to mobile photography–the means for flow is always right there with me. “Expansion” was taken and processed in an iPhone 5s.

A Little Fun with my iPhone on a Wet, Foggy Day

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There was a beautiful fog when I stepped outside work today. I love fog (see here and here). I will stop on the side of the road if needed in order to get a shot. Fortunately, I didn’t have to do that today.* The field behind the Y–right across the street–was beckoning with oh-so-many possibilities.

I shot in black and white with MPro, but when I came home I couldn’t resist playing around. I’m searching for a formula for a certain type of sepia and I haven’t found it yet. I’ll be patient. I’ve only recently started mixing different filters from different apps to find the perfect one. Today I played with the photos in Snapseed and Stackables apps. I didn’t get it today, but I definitely had fun trying. The collage was made with Moldiv.

*Does stopping by the library to get a picture of the water tower count?